In May, You Won’t Have to Stay up Late to See Planets


This month’s sky will feature great views of Saturn and Mars all night long and a possible new meteor shower.

Mars dims and shrinks in diameter quite a bit this month, but it’s easy to spot high in the Southern sky. Saturn reaches opposition on May 10, rising at sunset and setting just before sunrise. This month the north side of the ring plane is tilted 21.7 degrees, providing a beautiful view of the planet’s north pole. Even through modest telescopes, you can see some detail on the pole.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/videos/2014/05/may-you-won%E2%80%99t-have-stay-late-see-planets

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When water droplets sit on a cold substrate, they freeze into a shape with a pointed tip. At first glance, this behavior seems very odd since surface tension usually acts to prevent such sharp protrusions. The shape is, however, a result of water’s expansion as it freezes. The droplet freezes from the substrate upward, with a concave shape to the solidification front. The angle of the point does not depend on the substrate temperature or the wetting angle between the water and surface. Instead, it turns out that this concave front shape and water’s expansion are the key factors that determine the pointed cusp’s angle, and that the final geometry of the cusp is essentially universal. (Video credit: M. Nauenberg; additional research credit: A. Marin et al.)

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How to See Without Glasses

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Amazing Math GIFS

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What is DNA?

This BBC explainer video does a wonderful job telling us.

We, and every other living thing on Earth, are connected.

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How Birds Really See the World

Ever wonder what it looks like from a birds-eye-view? Hank explains they see more than you think!

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Wake County Public Schools held a press conference Thursday to talk about the alarming increase in mid-year teacher resignations.

Wake County Public Schools officials said 600 teachers have quit since the start of the school year, an “alarming” increase in teacher exodus that has the school system concerned.

Wake County Public Schools officials said 600 teachers have quit since the start of the school year, an “alarming” increase in teacher exodus that has the school system concerned.

Superintendent Jim Merrill said state lawmakers need to find a way to compensate teachers. 

"We can’t sound the alarm any more than is occurring across the state,” Merrill said. "I need somebody to care and I need somebody to recognize the problem and I need the people who can do something about it to listen and respond."

WCPSS Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources Doug Thilman, Assistant Dean for Professional Education and Accreditation Dr. Michael Maher and Underwood Elementary Principal Jacqueline Jordan addressed the matter at a Thursday afternoon press conference.

“While these figures are alarming, they are not surprising. Given the flat pay scale over the past few years, the recent legislated removal of both career status and higher pay for teachers with graduate degrees, increased teacher turnover has been expected,” Thilman said.

Jordan told reporters her school had lost five teachers this year.

Maher said fewer students are looking to be teachers, which could lead to hiring problems down the line.

"As today’s teachers leave their classrooms for other careers or other states, the supply of new teachers to fill those empty slots is declining,” said Maher said in a statement. “The pipeline is drying up, and this has both immediate and lingering long-term effects on the quality of teachers in North Carolina classrooms and ultimately student achievement.”

They also discussed the lack of NC-trained teachers who are qualified to fill the empty positions. North Carolina State University said the number of students choosing to go into teaching is around 20 percent. The University also said its seen an increase of graduates taking teaching jobs in other states. 

The press conference was held at Underwood Elementary Schools on Glenwood Avenue.

Officials at two other area districts could not give exact numbers on how many teachers are leaving their districts.

Chrissy Pearson, chief communications officer for the Durham Public Schools, said this is spring break for Durham schools and exact numbers were not available.

"What we’re saying in general is that we are definitely aware teachers are being pressured to look at different career choices are looking [to go to other states]. I do think that’s changed in the last few years."

A spokeswoman for Johnston County Schools said their schools are on break this week and numbers for teacher departures this year were not available.

In 2013, 13 percent of North Carolina teachers left their jobs. That’s an increase over 12 percent in 2012 and 11 percent in 2011.

Gov. Pat McCrory originally had a 1 percent increase for teachers in his proposed budget, but that failed to make it through the General Assembly. McCrory and other state leaders are now proposing to raise pay for starting teachers and will push for that in the upcoming legislative session.

Copyright 2014 WNCN. All rights reserved.

(Source: invisiblelad)

Hands-on Program Helps Students, Algae Grow
Extensive lab facilities and a real-world learning approach at a Texas community college has put students and their algae research on a path to success.Biotechnology student Timothy Hall squinted at a flask full of algae, then carefully placed a few drops into a lab instrument using a pipette. In a few seconds, hundreds of green algal cells appeared on screen. He clicked on several of the digital images, reviewed their measurements and other data and analyzed it for trends or patterns. Hall goes through this process almost daily, monitoring the growth of algal cells and their production of lipids as part of primary research he’s conducting in hopes of someday leading a viable commercial enterprise selling algae as feedstock for biofuel production and other applications. But Hall hasn’t looked for any venture funding. His work on moving America toward energy independence is part of his associate degree program in biotechnology at Lone Star Community College’s Montgomery campus in Conroe, Texas.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/04/hands-program-helps-students-algae-grow

Hands-on Program Helps Students, Algae Grow


Extensive lab facilities and a real-world learning approach at a Texas community college has put students and their algae research on a path to success.

Biotechnology student Timothy Hall squinted at a flask full of algae, then carefully placed a few drops into a lab instrument using a pipette. In a few seconds, hundreds of green algal cells appeared on screen. He clicked on several of the digital images, reviewed their measurements and other data and analyzed it for trends or patterns. Hall goes through this process almost daily, monitoring the growth of algal cells and their production of lipids as part of primary research he’s conducting in hopes of someday leading a viable commercial enterprise selling algae as feedstock for biofuel production and other applications. But Hall hasn’t looked for any venture funding. His work on moving America toward energy independence is part of his associate degree program in biotechnology at Lone Star Community College’s Montgomery campus in Conroe, Texas.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/articles/2014/04/hands-program-helps-students-algae-grow

(Source: laboratoryequipment)

Scale of the universe

Scroll to your heart’s content from the Planck length to the diameter of the observable universe - click on any object and it will open an info box - I can’t imagine how much work must have gone into this. A few surprising things: Pluto has a smaller diameter than the width of the USA and Vatican city can fit in central park multiple times.

Find it here

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Nerdy Engineer: Neil Armstrong on Being a Nerd

An Engineering Manifesto by the first man on the moon. “Science is about what is. Engineering is about what CAN be.”

From “The Engineering Century”, delivered at the National Press Club on February 22, 2000. Audio used with kind permission from the NPC and C-SPAN.

Animated by Jorge Cham - jorgecham.com
Produced by PHD TV, Allison Okamura and Maria Yang

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